Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

A dose of fetish. Good friends. An incomparable muse.

Tale Weaver #121 25.05.17: Reverse/Naughty Fairy Tales

Earlier in the tale weaving saga, Michael encouraged us to write bedtime stories for adults. I’m revisiting that prompt, with a wink and a nod, and thinking concepts like: an evil fairy godmother; family/personal revenge (Big Bad Wolf vs the Riding Hoods); Snow White as seductress or kept woman taking advantage of the dwarves’ affection; a reversal of fortunes in a previously happy ever after story; Rapunzel gets a hair cut. I think you get the idea.

If your naughtiness strays into adult material, please include an opening statement telling the reader the material is of that nature.

So play with the idea of weaving a new version of an old fairy tale, turn the genre upside, write from the villain’s perspective or add a bit of spice.

Please create a link (ping back) to this page. Tags: Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie; Tale Weaver; fairy tale. Mr. Naughty also know as Mr. Linky, awaits your clink.

(Image from The Paper Bag Princess by Robert Munch. An absolute favourite of mine!)

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About Lorraine

: ) : learning to embrace the fey uniqueness that is me

44 comments on “Tale Weaver #121 25.05.17: Reverse/Naughty Fairy Tales

  1. Henrietta Watson
    May 25, 2017

    Reblogged this on All About Writing and more.

  2. searchforserenity
    May 25, 2017

    Will be interesting following this

    • Lorraine
      May 25, 2017

      I’m looking forward to reading where folks might take this prompt — hopefully for a raucous, rambunctious “rompt”

  3. Pingback: Tale Weaver #121 25.05.17: Reverse/Naughty Fairy Tales – Hilda-May’s Night Out. | Morpethroad

    • Lorraine
      May 26, 2017

      Thanks for a fairy tale with attitude! Tennis tour, indeed!

  4. Pingback: Tale Weaver # : Flash Noir: Mean Streets of Fairyland – Lorraine's frilly freudian slip

  5. Pingback: Rotten or Poisonous? – Word Adventures

  6. flashpoetguy
    May 25, 2017

    ONCE UPON A TIME

    She claimed she knew them all. The fairy-tale books she piled waist-high at the side of her bed. The magic words, the fabricated incantations she would whisper after hurried night prayers, the tapping of the magic wand that, once she fell asleep would release a parade of characters into the wilds of dream fields: those heroes and heroines, monsters and villains scrambling to be set free from the hollow wand with which she nestled in her bed.

    In truth, Mae at nearly ninety years old, knew none of them. Since childhood she had gone through the ritual almost every night: she placed the tall stick on the pillow beside her, recited gibberish she called magic, said her night prayers, closed her eyes, and pretended dreams would carry her into the fairy-tale kingdom beyond the ivy gates.

    So much work to be done there, she hoped at least once before death came calling she would enter. She thought of the Big Bad Wolf, how she would accompany Little Red Riding Hood to her Grandma’s house, armed with her own axe that would smite the hungry beast.

    She took pity on the goose that laid golden eggs, how thieves lay in waiting to rob them from her. She wanted to free all the fairy-tale princesses from too long a sleep, rid the land of evil witches, burn their poisonous apples, convince the duckling she was not ugly after all, tell Peter Pan to grow up, show Dorothy the way back to her Kansas farm. There was so much evil out there and so many deeds of kindness she desperately wished to do!

    One night, without much hope after decades of failure, she found herself in the woods of dream, waving her magic wand at trolls, ravens, ogres, giants, goblins, and nasty stepmothers.

    Though old, her voice, vibrantly strong, echoed through the trees. She was that little girl again, fearless, loving, extending her wand at whatever bared its fangs and delighted in the fire that gushed from the pulsating light of the cane’s tip and the agonizing screams of the vanquished.

    In the morning, the new sun, full of morning gold, climbed free of the horizon, but the bed was empty of woman and wand.

    In the aftermath of her disappearance, for years, neighbors and family spoke of the eccentric woman as “the-once-upon-a-time lady” in Apartment 5.

    #

    • scribblersdip
      May 26, 2017

      Wow! What a great story 🙂

      I really enjoyed the set up – the tired and true and how the longing, the deepest desires and intentions after so many years still flickered in her heart. Great details, really caught me in right from the beginning. Super tale.

      • flashpoetguy
        May 26, 2017

        Every fairy tale, both the old and the new, provide underlying lessons for us to follow. Thanks for praising mine.

      • scribblersdip
        May 26, 2017

        Absolutely – just like fables. And it is a wonderful write 🙂

    • Lorraine
      May 26, 2017

      An excellent fairy tale, with a wonderful happily ever after ending.
      I loved the undercurrent of edginess — bringing an axe to Grandma’s house, etc. and the harkening back to the more “grimm” manner of fairy tales.
      I like how Mae was remembered as the “once-upon-a-time lady,” an epithet and epitaph she would appreciate, I’m sure.
      Thanks for playing along.

      • flashpoetguy
        May 26, 2017

        Thanks. It was a lot of fun.

    • Isabel Caves
      May 26, 2017

      A lovely read! I enjoyed it.

  7. scribblersdip
    May 26, 2017

    Great prompt Lorraine 🙂

    And now, to set my thinking cap on and see where the mind wanders and what scribbles may play 😉

  8. Lorraine
    May 26, 2017

    Looking forward to whatever emerges from under your thinking cap.
    Personally, I prefer thinking caps of the baseball variety. Currently switching between my Vancouver Olympics red hockey team “believe” and my Cornell Ornithology Sapsucker Woods black with bird logo ones. On serious thinking days, I tend towards my old bright orange LL Bean cap.

    • scribblersdip
      May 26, 2017

      Sounds like quite the collection – and well suited for different purposes too 🙂 (and this idea, of actual hats/caps and choosing to deliberately use “accessories” as aids and tools, in a semi-conscious or even subconscious, or deliberate way, has me smiling, “inside”) …..

      • Lorraine
        May 27, 2017

        Yes, I do look strange should someone come to the door and I answer with my ball cap on. If raining, I could say “Leaky roof!”

      • scribblersdip
        May 27, 2017

        LOL – great answer! but hey, people wear hats inside all the time … so it’s all good 🙂

  9. Pingback: Mirror Mirror – The Bag Lady

  10. Pingback: The Big Bad Wolf’s Very Bad Day | Isabel Caves

  11. Isabel Caves
    May 26, 2017

    I had a go at writing about a character who tends to get a bad rap in fairytales…https://isabelcaves.wordpress.com/2017/05/26/the-big-bad-wolfs-very-bad-day/

    • Lorraine
      May 27, 2017

      This is a wonderfully witty take — I think BB Wolf’s rep might be improving.

  12. flashpoetguy
    May 26, 2017

    The humor in your tale,Isabel, is priceless!

  13. Pingback: Out-takes and Doppelgängers | Scribbler's Dipstick

  14. scribblersdip
    May 27, 2017

    Okay – done and done. Had fun 🙂 Lots of it actually. Hope it gives you a laugh 😉

    • Lorraine
      May 27, 2017

      More than a laugh, an out-loud-the- neighbours-are-wondering hoot.
      I left the beginnings of a comment; there is just too much good material to mention all in one comment.
      Hope you get to the Mouse Trap on Saturday night — always a good time if you know the band.

      • scribblersdip
        May 27, 2017

        thanks – saw, read and replied – and it would make for a lovely change to be out and about 😉

        glad you had a good laugh …. keep smiling, the neighbours deserve to wonder what’s going on 😉

      • Lorraine
        May 27, 2017

        Especially my neighbours, but that’s another fairy tale . . .

      • scribblersdip
        May 28, 2017

        LOL 😉 you should write snippets, even if just for yourself ….

  15. searchforserenity
    May 27, 2017

    Absolutely love this!

    • Lorraine
      May 27, 2017

      Thanks. It was fun, and the faux fairy tale flash noir seemed just right. May be more on policing those “grimm” mean streets of Fairyland.

  16. Pingback: The Prince And The Pine Cone | The Story Files

  17. hrh66
    May 31, 2017

    First time I’ve joined in and I’m hooked now. Here’s my take on this; https://thestoryfiles.wordpress.com/2017/05/31/the-prince-and-the-pine-cone/

    • Lorraine
      June 1, 2017

      Glad you’re hooked! Looking forward to more of your stories. I think you’ve helped improve BB Wolf’s image; great take on the classic baddy.

      • hrh66
        June 1, 2017

        Thanks 🙂

  18. Pingback: Tale Weavers: Fiction – The Wolf with Shamrock Eyes #poetry #amwriting #taleweavers – Mandibelle16

    • Lorraine
      June 1, 2017

      I hope you do get some time to come back . . . I do see a sequel, prequel, and so on.

  19. Pingback: Tale Weaver 135: Princess Charm-Less – Lorraine's frilly freudian slip

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