Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

A dose of fetish. Good friends. An incomparable muse.

B&P’s Shadorma and Beyond – Tritina Poem – April 16, 2016

 

Hello Folks … ready for a new form?

Today we’re going to look into a little poem called the “Tritina”  The Tritina is the little cousin of the Sestina, a very complex 36 line poem from the twelfth century which we’ll look further into one day 😉 .

How does the Tritina work:

The “Tritina” is a ten lined poem, divided over three tercets with a single line at the end of the poem. You can stop after the ten lines or create sequences to make a longer poem. Tritinas arose in the 20th century. They use three end words that are repeated throughout the poem.

Guidelines to writing a poem in Tritina form:

The poem has ten lines, grouped into three tercets and one conclusive line.

Tritinas have no meter requirements – However whatever meter you pick, you should try to stick with it to maintain the rhythm of your poem.

The rhyme scheme, if you choose to have one, is based on the three end words you choose.
Having chosen your three words, your pattern should look like this: ABC, CAB, BCA and the last line have all three words in it, bringing you back to ABC.

And here’s an example of how it’s done in rhyme:

“The Melody”

In my ears ring this sweet melody
The beating of a healing heart
The suturing of a frayed soul

The needle that stitches this tattered soul
Is the peaceful chiming of the melody
Of an ever mending heart

To you I give this beating heart
To you I bear my sutured soul
With you I share this curative melody

This ever ringing melody, healing this heart and sewing this soul

Skylar Spring © copyright 2011

And now for a little inspiration:

 

Or you might want to choose another stimulating painting, photo or piece of music to inspire you to write either the Tritina or a variation of the Shadorma.

Once you have done so please tag:  Mindlovesmisery’s Menagerie and B&P’s Shadorma and Beyond and then add your name to the Mr. Linky app below.

Have a great week folks!  Bastet

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About Bastet

I love to read...I like to write...I've travelled the world and seen the sites. I'm past my prime and feel so young, especially when near the young. I'm writing this blog, to remember, to think and to share...with the hopes that someone else will make a comment that will stimulate new thoughts and pathways. Actually, I'm a gabber, so the logical extension of gabbing is blogging! ;-)

10 comments on “B&P’s Shadorma and Beyond – Tritina Poem – April 16, 2016

  1. Pingback: Lakeside – writing in north norfolk

  2. Pingback: B&P’s Shadorma and Music Prompt – ladyleemanila

  3. Pingback: the group of seven shadorma* | adarkenedhouse

  4. a darkened house
    April 18, 2016

    This is more an art history lesson than a Shadorma, I’m afraid.

    • Bastet
      April 18, 2016

      Hmm … I read the piece and liked it very much … to tell the truth I didn’t know anything about the artist from whom I borrowed the painting .. just that I liked it very much. You’re piece, if you put the poem at the end of the information about the poet could be a sort of a shadorma haibun I think. I really enjoyed the shadorma as well .. splendid poetic reiteration of the paintings! BTW .. couldn’t comment on your post. I’ve come across that problem with another blogger from WordPress, perhaps you might want to look into: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26VfiQKoomw

  5. Pingback: (s) MLMM Shadorma + More Than a Ten Foot Pole (4.23) | Jules Longer Strands of Gems

  6. julespaige
    April 23, 2016

    Just the Tritina this week
    More Than a Ten Foot Pole

    • Bastet
      April 25, 2016

      I liked reading this very much … i’m only sorry I’m so late telling you what a wonderful job you did with the tritina!

      • julespaige
        April 25, 2016

        You are always right on time.
        I posted it late…
        ..that being occupied with life thing 😉

      • Bastet
        April 26, 2016

        LOL … ah yes .. that occupied with life thing does have a tendency to get in my way too 🙂

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