Mindlovemisery's Menagerie

A dose of fetish. Good friends. An incomparable muse.

Heeding Haiku With HA: To Derive Inspiration From Poetry # 5

This is the fifth installment of the prompt series, in which we derive inspiration from a soulful poem by a renowned Romantic poet, famous for his flamboyancy and controversial affairs, Lord Byron.

I Speak Not, I Trace Not, I Breathe Not Thy Name

I speak not, I trace not, I breathe not thy name;
There is grief in the sound, there is guilt in the fame;
But the tear that now burns on my cheek may impart
The deep thoughts that dwell in that silence of heart.
Too brief for our passion, too long for our peace,
Were those hours – can their joy or their bitterness cease?
We repent, we abjure, we will break from our chain, –
We will part, we will fly to – unite it again!
Oh! thine be the gladness, and mine be the guilt!
Forgive me, adored one! – forsake if thou wilt;
But the heart which is thine shall expire undebased,
And man shall not break it – whatever thou may’st.
And stern to the haughty, but humble to thee,
This soul in its bitterest blackness shall be;
And our days seem as swift, and our moments more sweet,
With thee at my side, than with worlds at our feet.
One sigh of thy sorrow, one look of thy love,
Shall turn me or fix, shall reward or reprove.
And the heartless may wonder at all I resign –
Thy lips shall reply, not to them, but to mine

It has been a while since the last Deriving Inspiration prompt and thus, I thought of bringing forth another one, wherein we read and cherish the love-ridden words of Lord Byron. This poem has a charming flow to it, which could make anyone smile. This week, I would like you to write a haiku or tanka, after when you have enjoyed this poem.

Basic guidelines:

  • English Haiku is a three-line poem structured in syllable count of 5-7-5. It visualizes an image, an expression or experience which can be measured in the time it takes you to inhale and exhale. Including a season word or kigo is an important element of haiku.
  • English Tanka is a five-line poem structured in syllable pattern of  5-7-5-7-7. The first two lines and the last two lines picture images and the third line is a pivotal line i.e. it signifies a grammatically correct meaning and completes the image either when paired with the first two lines or when paired with the last two lines.
  • Most importantly, feel free and write, do not be burdened by the rules or guidelines. Enjoy crafting a haiku or tanka. And after when you have made the post, you can submit the links to your posts in the linking widget below.

Happy Writing!

You can also add the following two tags with your post: HeedingHaikuWithHA and MindLoveMisery’sMenagerie.

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About anmol(alias HA)

I am a whimsical writer, a passionate poet and a righteous reader, but above all I am a benign being drifting along the winds of the days that make a lifetime.

7 comments on “Heeding Haiku With HA: To Derive Inspiration From Poetry # 5

  1. Pingback: When the Spider Bites | Girlgoyle. Banished.

  2. Pingback: 9.25 plaited prompts: …the emperor ate… | julesgemstonepages

  3. julespaige
    September 25, 2014

    Fun when with a little twist, perhaps with slight of dread
    Tells a tales retold spun from air and maybe silken spiders’ thread?

    https://julesgemstonepages.wordpress.com/2014/09/25/9-25-plaited-prompts-the-emperor-ate/

    • anmol(alias HA)
      September 28, 2014

      I found it really interesting. Thanks for sharing with us this week. 🙂

  4. Pingback: The Heat (Tanka) | Blog It or Lose It!

  5. Pingback: Poetry Freeforall: Come and Get ‘Em | Margo Roby: Wordgathering

  6. Pingback: Haiku for Ha – (Senryu-Tanka) September 29, 2014 | Bastet and Sekhmet's Library

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